Brookline Historical Society
Photo Collection

Edward W. Packard, Grocer, Brookline Village
219 Washington St. from approx. 1879 - 1885, His brother, Eugene, was a clerk in the store.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
Harvard Square, Brookline Village, 1905
Looking north from Washington St.
Harvard Square, Brookline Village, 1907
The Harvard Hall building has been replaced with the building that still stands today.
Harvard Square, Brookline Village, Circa 1908
Looking north from Washington St. at Rhodes Bros. Grocers
Harvard Square, Brookline Village, 1910s
Looking north from Washington St.
Harvard Square, Brookline Village, 1915
Looking north from Washington St.
Harvard Square, Brookline Village, 1939
Looking north from Washington St.
Charles E. Schmalz, Haircutter
Circa 1901. 240 Washington St. Brookline Village corner of Davis Ave. The St. Andrew Building.
Panter's Building; Brookline Village, Looking North from Washington St.
Panter's Building was a remodeling of the old Baptist church building at that site. It was obtained by John Panter as payment for his work on the replacement church, seen behind it, and converted into a commerical building. He later sold it to George Joyce who moved his grocery store from the Colonnade Building circa 1874.
Panter's Building; Brookline Village, circa 1883
Washington St. continuing to the left, Harvard St. to the right. Note horse drinking water in front of the store. The Joyce grocery store had originally occupied both sides of the building. Circa 1883, Joyce briefly downsized to the right side only, seen here, and was gone entirely by 1885. Thomas H. Dyer, grocer, would occupy the left side until 1904; Frank F. Seamens, Groceries, would replace Joyce circa 1885 and also remain until 1904 when the building was replaced by the building that stands today.
Harvard Square, Brookline Village
Washington St. continuing to the left, Harvard St. to the right. The Panter's Building has been sold and renamed to the Harvard Hall building. In the center are the stores of Thomas H. Dyer, grocer, and Frank F. Seamens, Groceries. Both would remain until 1904 when the building was replaced by the building that stands today. To the left, at 259 Washington St., is the store of Nelson C. Thompson, who took over the furniture and upholstery business from his father. E. S. Morse is seen making a delivery of what is likely coal. The red brick National Bank building, on the right, is still in use today.
Harvard Square, Brookline Village, circa 1903
This photo most likey shows the final stage of the building at 11-13 Harvard Square. On the left,with its delivery wagons parked out front, is T. H. Dyer, Provisions. On the right, at #13 Harvard Sq., is Frank F. Seamens, Groceries. It appears that Lucius N. Danforth, a clerk at the Dyer store for two decades and at the George Joyce store there before that, has taken over the store. But the Danforth store will be short-lived: the building that exists today is about to be constructed there with Rhodes Bros. taking over occupancy.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
285 Washington St., circa 1904
The focus of this photo is the residence and business of Gertrude F. Wallace, hairdresser, at 285 Washington St. But the other structures to the right provide a rare documentation of the demoltion of Harvard Hall in preparation for the erection of the building that is there today at the apex of Harvard and Washington streets.There is a workman on the roof of the just-closed furniture and upholstery business of Nelson C. Thompson. To the right of that, somewhat telescoped in size, is the Harvard Hall building housing two grocers and in the distance is the corner of the National Bank building.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
289, 287, 285 Washington St., 1903
Morris Salis started his tailor shop here in 1903 and remained for two decades. Sharing #289 is Charles Lot James, Real Estate. Gertrude F. Wallace was a hairdresser in the building to the right, #285 (still standing in modified form), until 1908-9. Harvard Square is a few steps to the right.
[Source: Digital Commonwealth]
287 and 289 Washington St., Brookline Village
These businesses were together at this location from 1909/1910 to 1916. Morris Salis, tailor, and Louis Ianneville, shoe repair, were at 289 Washington St. while Thomas F. Thompson, painter, was at #287. Harvard Square is a few steps to the right.
[Source: Historic New England]
Brookline Village, Northwest Corner, Washington St. & Davis
Washington St. going north to the right; Davis on the left. The second floor was used by dancing and singing schools. Replaced by the brick Seamans building.
Town Hall (3rd)
Town Hall (2nd), Prospect St.
Built 1845. Later became the police station.
American Legion Post 11, 1931
Note the beautiful front of the old town hall
Town Hall (3rd)
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